By River Forest Dental Studio
March 15, 2022
Category: Cosmetic Dentistry
Tags: Crowns and Bridges  

Discover the benefits of getting dental crowns and bridges for your smile.

Accidents happen! Yes, even to your smile. Whether you are dealing with extensive decay, or a cracked or broken tooth, Dr. Gina Piccioni at River Forest Dental Studio in River Forest, IL, is here to tell you how getting dental crowns and bridges could turn your smile around.

What are crowns and bridges?

These fixed dental restorations are custom-made just for you. A crown is a tooth-shaped cap that is placed over a tooth to improve its function and appearance while a dental bridge is used to fill gaps and replace one or more missing teeth.

Why might I get a crown?

A crown is a very versatile restoration that can be used to protect a tooth from further damage. A tooth weakened by decay, infection, or trauma can often benefit from getting a crown. A crown will surround the tooth and provide a stronger and more durable outer layer of protection.

A crown may be recommended if you have a cracked, fractured, or broken tooth, if you have a tooth that is badly misshapen or discolored, or if you just underwent root canal therapy.

When are dental bridges needed?

A dental bridge is a fixed oral prosthetic that is designed to replace a single missing tooth or a few missing teeth in a row. A bridge uses two dental crowns, which are placed over healthy teeth on both sides of the gap. The bridge, which contains false teeth, will be fused with the crowns to anchor the artificial teeth in the middle.

Dental crowns and bridges offer an array of benefits, from treating tooth loss and filling gaps left behind by missing teeth, to protecting teeth from further damage and improving the aesthetics of your smile. 

Do you want to know more about dental crowns, bridges, and other restorative dentistry options we offer? If so, all you have to do is call Dr. Gina Piccioni at River Forest Dental Studio in River Forest, IL. You can reach our office at 708-366-6760.

By River Forest Dental Studio
February 17, 2022
Category: Cosmetic Dentistry
Tags: veneers  

Are you looking to improve the appearance of your front teeth? Dental veneers are widely used to improve the appearance of front teeth and are a much more conservative option than a full dental crown. Veneers can be used to improve the appearance of staining, large gaps, large fillings, chipped teeth, or overall shape. Veneers are a thin covering over the front and biting end of the tooth used to restore the beauty of a smile. Over the years Dr. John Hartmann and Dr. Gina Piccioni have helped many patients who opted for veneers and now have the confidence to smile again. Just contact River Forest Dental Studio in River Forest, IL, to set up your appointment today.

Dental veneers are made in a lab from long-lasting porcelain materials. The shade can be chosen to any desired color to whiten the appearance of your smile. Dental veneers are usually placed on the anterior, or front teeth, where the chewing forces are not as hard as the back teeth. The process of placing veneers is relatively easy, requiring only two dental appointments. In some cases, only one appointment is needed. It depends on the fabrication process.

The first appointment is to “prep” the teeth and takes an impression to be sent to a lab to fabricate the veneers. Veneers are fairly conservative in the preparation as it requires a small amount of space to be created on the face (front), bottom, and sides of each tooth to allow space for the veneer to be placed and look natural. You will leave the office with temporary veneers for the next week or two while the permanent veneers are being made.

The second appointment is to place the veneers and make minor adjustments if needed. What a difference it makes in the appearance of the teeth! If you’re interested in learning more, give Dr. John Hartmann and Dr. Gina Piccioni a call today! You can reach River Forest Dental Studio in River Forest, IL, at (708) 366-6760.

By River Forest Dental Studio
February 10, 2022
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants  
BeforeReplacingYourMissingTeethYouMayNeedOtherDentalWork

Replacing missing teeth can do wonders for a smile. And you have solid options for doing so, from a partial denture to state-of-the-art dental implants. But there might be a roadblock to your restoration plan—literally. Some of your other teeth may be in the way.

When a tooth has been missing for a while, the teeth on either side of a tooth gap will naturally begin to move or “drift” into the space. This could result in an inadequate amount of available space for a prosthetic (false) tooth.

If that happens, we'll first need to move the errant teeth back to where they belong, either with traditional braces or removable clear aligners. If we're successful, we can then proceed with the missing tooth restoration.

But before starting orthodontic treatment, there may be another problem that needs our attention first. If your missing teeth are the result of periodontal (gum) disease, your gums and supporting bone may not be as healthy as they need to be. This can interfere with orthodontics, which often depends on the gums and bone around a tooth being healthy enough to reform as the tooth moves. That may not be possible if they're still infected with gum disease or you've suffered significant bone loss.

If that's the case, it may be necessary to first treat any gum disease present and rebuild the bone. The latter can often be done by grafting bone material to the area of loss. The graft then serves as a scaffold of sorts upon which new bone can grow and accumulate. And reducing gum disease, mainly by removing bacterial plaque, allows the gums to heal and regain attachment with the teeth.

Once your gums and bone are healthy again, we can then proceed with orthodontics. After the teeth are reasonably aligned, we can then complete the restoration for replacing your missing teeth, and any other cosmetic enhancements for your remaining teeth like veneers or crowns.

The entire process may take some time and multiple treatment visits. But gaining a more attractive smile in the end is well worth it.

If you would like more information on dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.

By River Forest Dental Studio
January 31, 2022
Category: Oral Health
AMinorProcedureCouldHelpanInfantWithThisNursingProblem

Newborns come into the world eager and ready to partake of their mother's milk. But an anatomical quirk with some infants could make breastfeeding more difficult for them.

The structure in question is a frenum, a tiny band of tissue connecting softer parts of the mouth with firmer parts, like the upper lip to the gums, and the tongue to the floor of the mouth. If they're abnormally short, thick or tight, however, the baby might find it difficult to obtain a good seal around the mother's nipple.

Without that seal, the baby has a difficult time drawing milk out of the breast and as a result, they may attempt to compensate by chewing on the nipple. The sad outcome is often continuing hunger and frustration for the baby, and pain for the mother.

To alleviate this problem, a physician can clip the frenum to loosen it. Known as a frenotomy, (or a frenectomy or frenuplasty, depending on the exact actions taken), it's a minor procedure a doctor can perform in their office.

It begins with the doctor deadening the area with a numbing gel or injected anesthesia. After a few minutes to allow the anesthesia to take effect, they clip the frenum with surgical scissors or with a laser (there's usually little to no bleeding with the latter).

Once the frenum has been clipped, the baby should be able to nurse right away. However, they may have a learning curve to using the now freed-up parts of their mouth to obtain a solid seal while nursing.

Abnormal frenums that interfere with nursing are usually treated as soon as possible. But even if it isn't impeding breastfeeding, an abnormal frenum could eventually interfere with other functions like speech development, or it could foster the development of a gap between the front teeth. It may be necessary, then, to revisit the frenum at an older age and treat it at that time.

Although technically a surgical procedure, frenotomies are minor and safe to perform on newborns. Their outcome, though, can be transformative, allowing a newborn to gain the full nourishment and emotional bonding they need while breastfeeding.

If you would like more information on tongue or lip ties, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Tongue Ties, Lip Ties and Breastfeeding.”

By River Forest Dental Studio
January 21, 2022
Category: Dental Procedures
WhetherVotingforaCandidateorWisdomTeethYouCanChooseWisely

During election season, you'll often hear celebrities encouraging you to vote. But this year, Kaia Gerber, an up-and-coming model following the career path of her mother Cindy Crawford, made a unique election appeal—while getting her wisdom teeth removed.

With ice packs secured to her jaw, Gerber posted a selfie to social media right after her surgery. The caption read, “We don't need wisdom teeth to vote wisely.”

That's great advice—electing our leaders is one of the most important choices we make as a society. But Gerber's post also highlights another decision that bears careful consideration, whether or not to have your wisdom teeth removed.

Found in the very back of the mouth, wisdom teeth (or “third molars”) are usually the last of the permanent teeth to erupt between ages 17 and 25. But although their name may be a salute to coming of age, in reality wisdom teeth can be a pain. Because they're usually last to the party, they're often erupting in a jaw already crowded with teeth. Such a situation can be a recipe for numerous dental problems.

Crowded wisdom teeth may not erupt properly and remain totally or partially hidden within the gums (impaction). As such, they can impinge on and damage the roots of neighboring teeth, and can make overall hygiene more difficult, increasing the risk of dental disease. They can also help pressure other teeth out of position, resulting in an abnormal bite.

Because of this potential for problems, it's been a common practice in dentistry to remove wisdom teeth preemptively before any problems arise. As a result, wisdom teeth extractions are the top oral surgical procedure performed, with around 10 million of them removed every year.

But that practice is beginning to wane, as many dentists are now adopting more of a “wait and see” approach. If the wisdom teeth show signs of problems—impaction, tooth decay, gum disease or bite influence—removal is usually recommended. If not, though, the wisdom teeth are closely monitored during adolescence and early adulthood. If no problems develop, they may be left intact.

This approach works best if you maintain regular dental cleanings and checkups. During these visits, we'll be able to consistently evaluate the overall health of your mouth, particularly in relation to your wisdom teeth.

Just as getting information on candidates helps you decide your vote, this approach of watchful waiting can help us recommend the best course for your wisdom teeth. Whether you vote your wisdom teeth “in” or “out,” you'll be able to do it wisely.

If you would like more information about what's best to do about wisdom teeth, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “Wisdom Teeth.”





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Gina Piccioni, D.M.D. and John G. Hartmann, D.D.S.

River Forest, IL Dentist

River Forest Dental Studio

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