Posts for: February, 2013

By Dr. Hartmann D.D.S
February 26, 2013
Category: Dental Procedures
TurnBacktheClockwithWhiterTeeth

Your smile is one of the first things people notice, but if your pearly whites have lost their luster, chances are you might be hesitant to show them. As we age, our teeth naturally darken, and certain substances can leave teeth stained or discolored, making you appear older. One easy way to turn back the clock is to have your teeth whitened; a safe, painless, and non-invasive way of achieving a young, healthy-looking smile.

Causes of Tooth Discoloration: Exposure to high-levels of fluoride and taking tetracycline antibiotics during childhood can stain the teeth's structure. Smoking cigarettes and using chewing tobacco can also cause tooth discoloration, as well as foods containing tannins such as red wine, coffee and tea. In addition, poor brushing techniques and not flossing regularly cause bacteria to build on teeth resulting in yellow stains.

The Whitening Process: Our office can help you to achieve a brighter smile using either an in-office procedure or an at-home whitening kit. We can help determine the best treatment for your budget, time frame and individual needs. If you choose to have professional whitening done in our office, we will utilize a prescription strength gel sometimes even activated by a concentrated light source. This procedure offers immediate and long-lasting results in less than an hour. After a single treatment, teeth are typically six to ten shades lighter and with proper maintenance, can last five years or longer.

At-Home Results: For those seeking more gradual results, another option is to use custom-fit trays, which our office will make for you to use at home to whiten your teeth. This is generally less expensive, and is very effective at lightening teeth several shades, although it may take a week or longer to see optimal results.

Choosing the Best Procedure: For some people, teeth whitening may not offer adequate results. If you have thin enamel, chipped, uneven or crooked teeth, we may recommend applying porcelain veneers to restore your damaged teeth. Veneers are bonded to the front of teeth to give your smile a straighter, more uniform appearance.

Contact us today to schedule an appointment to discuss any questions you may have regarding teeth whitening. Read more about this topic in the Dear Doctor magazine article “Teeth Whitening: Brighter, Lighter, Whiter.”


ANewImprovedSolutionforLossofTeethintheLowerJaw

What does the term “two-implant overdentures” mean?
For more than a century, complete dentures were the only care option for edentulous (toothless) people. As a solution, these left a lot to be desired, particularly for the lower jaw. Now dental technology has developed a better alternative that combines two strategically placed dental implants and a traditional lower denture that has been modified to fit over the two implants — thus the term.

What are the problems with traditional dentures?
The problem is that when you lose teeth, the bone that supported the missing teeth begins to shrink away. This is known as resorption, and it is the reason that dentures fitted too soon after teeth are lost quickly become loose. Bone loss happens most rapidly during the first year and is four times greater in the lower jaw than in the upper.

Why not just use dental adhesives to hold dentures tightly to the lower jaw?
Zinc, a major ingredient in most dental adhesives, has been associated with neurological disorders and may be unsafe. In addition, dental adhesives are expensive and the cost of frequent usage adds up.

Besides dental adhesives, are other health problems associated with dentures?
Yes, edentulism has been related to poor nutrition. Many edentulous people switch to soft foods with high fat content because they find healthier foods like vegetables and proteins difficult to chew.

What are dental implants?
Dental implants are replacements for the roots of teeth, the parts that are below the gumline and anchored in bone. They are usually covered with a crown that shows above the line of the gums.

What are the benefits of implants?
Most importantly, implants reduce the amount of bone resorption. Studies have shown about 75% less resorption in parts of the jaw with implants compared to areas without them. Since most of the bone loss occurs within the first year after tooth loss, it is important to place implants within this time period.

Is a complete set of dental implants a good solution for edentulism?
Yes, it can be a good solution, but it is not for everyone. Some patients, who have lost a great deal of bone support, need another solution for cosmetic reasons that offer more facial support like an implant overdenture. In addition, depending on their resources and insurance, some people require a less expensive solution.

Why does the two-implant overdenture work better for the lower jaw?
Based on differences in bone volume, density and other factors, we think that four to six implants are needed to retain an upper implant overdenture. Thus a two-implant overdenture is a good solution to consider for a lower jaw, but other options might be preferred for an upper jaw.

Contact us today to schedule an appointment to discuss your questions about dentures and implants. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Implant Overdentures for the Lower Jaw.”


LooseLowerDentures-AnOldProblemwithaNewSolution

When a device meant to make your life easier doesn't function properly, it can be extremely frustrating. This is sometimes the case for people who wear lower dentures, which loosen over time. These removable replacement teeth can become less reliable and more uncomfortable. Why does this happen?

The answer is bone loss. When a tooth is lost, the bone surrounding it deteriorates and this will change the shape of the jawbone in your mouth. You may find that a lower denture that once had a snug fit on your lower jaw is now sliding around. This happens more often on the bottom because your muscular tongue pushes against the denture. Also, a top denture has more surface area due to an artificial palate to help create suction to the roof of the mouth and keep it in place.

Dental implants, which permanently replace the roots of teeth, do not loosen and they also prevent bone loss. But replacing a whole set of bottom teeth with dental implants and crowns is expensive. What to do?

There's a relatively new solution that combines the security of implants with the affordability of a removable denture. It's called an overdenture, and it may be something you want to consider. An overdenture is a lot like the removable lower denture you already have, only it fits over two implants strategically placed in your lower jaw. While the lower denture is still removable, its stability is greatly improved.

Studies have shown that people with two-implant overdentures have a higher quality of life, and receive better nutrition, than those wearing conventional dentures. It's not hard to figure out why: A more stable denture makes it easier to eat healthy foods such as vegetables — or, really, any foods — and prevents embarrassing slippage of false teeth.

If you are tired of living with a wiggly lower denture, contact us to discuss two-implant overdentures, or to schedule an appointment for a consultation.

You can read more about this topic in the Dear Doctor magazine article “Implant Overdentures for the Lower Jaw.”


By Dr. Hartmann D.D.S
February 03, 2013
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   nutrition  
HowMuchDoYouKnowAboutNutritionandOralHealth

How many of these questions can you answer correctly? The more you know about nutrition and oral health, the healthier you are likely to be.

What are free sugars?
“Free sugars” is a term for sugars including refined cane, beet and corn sugar, which are added to foods or occur naturally in honey, syrups or fruit juices.

You probably know that foods with added sugars are not healthy for your teeth. What is the maximum recommended sugar intake for oral health?
The recommended daily limit for free sugar is 10 teaspoons per day. Note that one can of soda contains over 6 teaspoons.

If a sugary snack is bad for your teeth, what could you substitute that would be better?
Fresh fruits and vegetables would be a better snack. Fresh fruits contain fructose, a sugar that has not been shown to be harmful to teeth if eaten in reasonable amounts.

How can you get enough fluoride to guard your teeth against decay?
If your water supply does not contain fluoride, or if you usually drink bottled water, you may or may not be receiving enough fluoride from your toothpaste. We can assess if you are receiving enough fluoride by examining your teeth, testing your plaque and reviewing your past history of tooth decay. If you are having a problem with tooth decay, we can create fluoride trays for you so you can apply a fluoride solution to your teeth daily.

What is dental erosion and how is it different from tooth decay?
Some acidic foods, particularly drinks such as juices and sodas, wear away your teeth's outer coating (the enamel) when exposed to the teeth's surface. Erosion does not involve bacteria, the cause of dental caries (tooth decay).

Can certain foods stop acidity from attacking your teeth?
Yes, there are foods that reverse the increase in acidity that comes from eating free sugars. One of these is cheese. Cheese stimulates saliva in your mouth, and it contains high levels of calcium, allowing calcium to be added back to your teeth. Many vegetables and starchy whole grain foods require thorough chewing, which also stimulates production of saliva and guards against tooth decay.

We hope you learned some useful facts from this nutrition quiz. If you modify your habits so that you eat less free sugar; drink more water (preferably fluoridated), drink fewer juices and sodas; and snack on fresh fruits, vegetables, and cheese, you can count on having healthy teeth and gums.

Contact us today to schedule an appointment to discuss your questions about diet and oral health. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Nutrition & Oral Health.”




Gina Piccioni, D.M.D. and John G. Hartmann, D.D.S.

River Forest, IL Dentist

River Forest Dental Studio

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